8.02.2011

Life Spilled Over.

I came home last night motivated to get my life our apartment in working order - a clean kitchen, washed, dried and folded laundry, sorted mail, dinner on the table by the time my husband arrived home. Recently I’ve not been disciplined as often as I should be about these things, and it leaves me with a nagging, constant guilt that eventually becomes impossible to ignore.

So I was nearly done making dinner, a quick batch of carbonara pasta, when I realized at the worst possible moment that I had no parmesan. The pasta was cooked and waiting. The zucchini and bacon were already a little overdone. What to do? In a nerve-wracking attempt to salvage my hard work I took the only cheese I had, feta, and mixed it in before I could change my mind. The result? It was not only edible, but oddly delicious. [Note for you culinary nerds that might be wondering: no, thank God, I had not stirred in the egg yet. Not sure how that would've turned out. Anyone tried it?]

My dishwashing attempts were likewise thwarted. Aside from the obvious liquid versus dry granules, there are significant differences between dish soap and dishwasher soap. I swallowed my sneaking suspicions and used the liquid dish soap since we were out of the dishwasher soap to save myself an extra hour of washing by hand. Result? My dishwasher was foaming at the mouth, spilling suds all over the floor. You can imagine my surprise as I flipped on the light to grab a glass of water. Perhaps it would have been better if I hadn’t filled the entire dispenser with the liquid soap, but oh well. To my own surprise, instead of freaking out like I’ve been prone to do on several pithy, fleeting occasions lately, I laughed out loud, alone in my apartment. And why not make a slip-n-slide mop the floor while I’m at it? My kitchen floor is now nearly clean enough to eat off of.

There on my hands and knees in the suds and scrubbing away at long-neglected grime, I thought once again about how hard it’s been for me to stay motivated during the last few months. With my mom struggling harder than ever against the cancer and the subsequent treatments and surgeries, I've been worried, angry, depressed. I’ve allowed the what-ifs and the should-haves to keep me unsettled, insecure. I’ve let two dominant, separate and equally loud voices to split myself apart, one that tells me,

“Stop forcing the moment and admit your fear. Cry. You’ll feel better.”

and the other that argues back,

“Get up. Move on. Forge ahead. Don’t stop for anything.”

And as a writer, these two voices have left me unproductive and indecisive. One part of me says,

“Write when you want to. You can’t force yourself. Wait for the lightbulb.”

and the other chides my artsy immaturity,

“If you’d just make time for your writing on a daily basis, the words will come. Make your passion your priority.”

Which is right? Which is better for me? Which will help me keep going?

With no right answer unveiled, I’ve let my habits become dormant and my emotions ebb and flow unchecked. I've been quiet around here, afraid of being too vulnerable, afraid that admitting anything will mean that I'm asking for a pity-party, wary of all the awkward flubs that people make when they don't know how to handle a person's grief.

I haven’t wanted to see the silver lining in anything for awhile, far too exhausted and angry to think that good things can come from this, soul-growing things, eternal things. What I want is a healthy, happy, whole family that can think about the next few months, years, even decades without the elephant in the room to block our perspective. What I want is normal, in the here and now.

Maybe it seems silly that screwing up dinner and accidentally Ajax-ing the linoleum gave me some much-needed perspective on my inner battles. But there I was on the kitchen floor, up to my elbows in normal and the residue of everyday life, suddenly and strangely comforted by this awareness: I can't control any of it. And for once it wasn't a hopeless feeling, but an understanding that things can still turn out well even if they don't go as planned. I can work hard, or I can take the time I need to let my emotions run their course. Either way, I'll be okay.

It wasn't a sickly sweet silver-lining that obscured the reality I'm facing, just a comfort to know that I can find motivation to do the simple things, be happy in the moment, and still find reasons to laugh about the mess that I am, inside and out.


3 comments:

Katy said...

So I might just read this at least three more times. It is very much what I needed to hear.

Last week I planned a funeral and buried a good friend.

Those two voices that you talk about seem to be at war in my own mind too. I think because I know that what I need to talk about is him... which is the very last thing I want to talk about.

For me, this post reminded me that I'm not alone. And that I don't always need the right answer. It reminded me that I do need to keep living and grieving, and finding the truth that is between those two places.

Thanks for making me laugh (and cry) and thanks for writing.


Oh, and just be sure not to use the wrong soap in the clothes washer....it's even worse than the dishwasher. :-)

Adriana said...

LOVE just LOVE.I loved this post.

Wish you a great deal of health for your mom and for your whole family.

Bethany said...

Katy - thinking of and praying for you during this difficult time. It's so hard to grieve over lost loved ones.

Adriana, thanks for your support and for your faithful readership. Your comments always make me smile. <3

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